Heat pump with electric furnace backup

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Jun 02, 2014 · Those who have central ducted heat pumps, normally an electric or oil backup system is already built into the system, kicking in automatically when necessary. This doesn’t require any intervention from the homeowner, meaning you don’t even have to worry about the outside temperature. Jun 02, 2014 · Those who have central ducted heat pumps, normally an electric or oil backup system is already built into the system, kicking in automatically when necessary. This doesn’t require any intervention from the homeowner, meaning you don’t even have to worry about the outside temperature. Jun 02, 2014 · Those who have central ducted heat pumps, normally an electric or oil backup system is already built into the system, kicking in automatically when necessary. This doesn’t require any intervention from the homeowner, meaning you don’t even have to worry about the outside temperature. Heat pumps are extremely efficient for cooling in the summer and for winter heating until temperatures drop below 35 degrees. At that point, most heat pumps will turn on costly electric heat strips, but a dual fuel heating and cooling system utilizes an efficient natural gas furnace, saving you from high electrical bills in the winter. And it's simple: There's nothing you need to do, a heat pump with gas furnace backup will switch automatically to the most efficient option possible. Heat pumps by themselves are very efficient, even into the teens. It is due to the lowered BTU capacity and therefore the need for some sort of backup heat that lowers the "overall" efficiency. Using a heat pump for moderate cold, and switching it off and going with furnace heat only is another price saving alternative. Jun 02, 2014 · Those who have central ducted heat pumps, normally an electric or oil backup system is already built into the system, kicking in automatically when necessary. This doesn’t require any intervention from the homeowner, meaning you don’t even have to worry about the outside temperature. Nov 22, 2016 · A heat pump condenses heat present in the outside air -- usually down to about 30-degrees Fahrenheit, depending on the region and the amount of moisture in the air -- and pumps it into the home. When the temperature drops below freezing, there's not enough heat in the air to sufficiently heat the home with the pump alone, so the backup electric or gas furnace kicks in to provide warmth. Nov 22, 2016 · A heat pump condenses heat present in the outside air -- usually down to about 30-degrees Fahrenheit, depending on the region and the amount of moisture in the air -- and pumps it into the home. When the temperature drops below freezing, there's not enough heat in the air to sufficiently heat the home with the pump alone, so the backup electric or gas furnace kicks in to provide warmth. Heat pumps are extremely efficient for cooling in the summer and for winter heating until temperatures drop below 35 degrees. At that point, most heat pumps will turn on costly electric heat strips, but a dual fuel heating and cooling system utilizes an efficient natural gas furnace, saving you from high electrical bills in the winter. And it's simple: There's nothing you need to do, a heat pump with gas furnace backup will switch automatically to the most efficient option possible. As others have indicated, it depends on your electric rates. I am in the Phila. region, and as a heat pump user ( with oil fired hydronic back up) I enjoy a whole house ( not just heat pump) electric rate decrease of aprox. 50% during Oct-March. Makes sense in my application. Heat pumps are extremely efficient for cooling in the summer and for winter heating until temperatures drop below 35 degrees. At that point, most heat pumps will turn on costly electric heat strips, but a dual fuel heating and cooling system utilizes an efficient natural gas furnace, saving you from high electrical bills in the winter. And it's simple: There's nothing you need to do, a heat pump with gas furnace backup will switch automatically to the most efficient option possible. As others have indicated, it depends on your electric rates. I am in the Phila. region, and as a heat pump user ( with oil fired hydronic back up) I enjoy a whole house ( not just heat pump) electric rate decrease of aprox. 50% during Oct-March. Makes sense in my application. Jun 02, 2014 · Those who have central ducted heat pumps, normally an electric or oil backup system is already built into the system, kicking in automatically when necessary. This doesn’t require any intervention from the homeowner, meaning you don’t even have to worry about the outside temperature. Heat pumps are extremely efficient for cooling in the summer and for winter heating until temperatures drop below 35 degrees. At that point, most heat pumps will turn on costly electric heat strips, but a dual fuel heating and cooling system utilizes an efficient natural gas furnace, saving you from high electrical bills in the winter. And it's simple: There's nothing you need to do, a heat pump with gas furnace backup will switch automatically to the most efficient option possible. Jun 02, 2014 · Those who have central ducted heat pumps, normally an electric or oil backup system is already built into the system, kicking in automatically when necessary. This doesn’t require any intervention from the homeowner, meaning you don’t even have to worry about the outside temperature. Nov 22, 2016 · A heat pump condenses heat present in the outside air -- usually down to about 30-degrees Fahrenheit, depending on the region and the amount of moisture in the air -- and pumps it into the home. When the temperature drops below freezing, there's not enough heat in the air to sufficiently heat the home with the pump alone, so the backup electric or gas furnace kicks in to provide warmth. Heat pumps are extremely efficient for cooling in the summer and for winter heating until temperatures drop below 35 degrees. At that point, most heat pumps will turn on costly electric heat strips, but a dual fuel heating and cooling system utilizes an efficient natural gas furnace, saving you from high electrical bills in the winter. And it's simple: There's nothing you need to do, a heat pump with gas furnace backup will switch automatically to the most efficient option possible. As others have indicated, it depends on your electric rates. I am in the Phila. region, and as a heat pump user ( with oil fired hydronic back up) I enjoy a whole house ( not just heat pump) electric rate decrease of aprox. 50% during Oct-March. Makes sense in my application. Heat pumps are extremely efficient for cooling in the summer and for winter heating until temperatures drop below 35 degrees. At that point, most heat pumps will turn on costly electric heat strips, but a dual fuel heating and cooling system utilizes an efficient natural gas furnace, saving you from high electrical bills in the winter. And it's simple: There's nothing you need to do, a heat pump with gas furnace backup will switch automatically to the most efficient option possible. Heat pumps by themselves are very efficient, even into the teens. It is due to the lowered BTU capacity and therefore the need for some sort of backup heat that lowers the "overall" efficiency. Using a heat pump for moderate cold, and switching it off and going with furnace heat only is another price saving alternative. Nov 22, 2016 · A heat pump condenses heat present in the outside air -- usually down to about 30-degrees Fahrenheit, depending on the region and the amount of moisture in the air -- and pumps it into the home. When the temperature drops below freezing, there's not enough heat in the air to sufficiently heat the home with the pump alone, so the backup electric or gas furnace kicks in to provide warmth. Heat pumps by themselves are very efficient, even into the teens. It is due to the lowered BTU capacity and therefore the need for some sort of backup heat that lowers the "overall" efficiency. Using a heat pump for moderate cold, and switching it off and going with furnace heat only is another price saving alternative. Nov 22, 2016 · A heat pump condenses heat present in the outside air -- usually down to about 30-degrees Fahrenheit, depending on the region and the amount of moisture in the air -- and pumps it into the home. When the temperature drops below freezing, there's not enough heat in the air to sufficiently heat the home with the pump alone, so the backup electric or gas furnace kicks in to provide warmth. As others have indicated, it depends on your electric rates. I am in the Phila. region, and as a heat pump user ( with oil fired hydronic back up) I enjoy a whole house ( not just heat pump) electric rate decrease of aprox. 50% during Oct-March. Makes sense in my application. Nov 22, 2016 · A heat pump condenses heat present in the outside air -- usually down to about 30-degrees Fahrenheit, depending on the region and the amount of moisture in the air -- and pumps it into the home. When the temperature drops below freezing, there's not enough heat in the air to sufficiently heat the home with the pump alone, so the backup electric or gas furnace kicks in to provide warmth. Nov 22, 2016 · A heat pump condenses heat present in the outside air -- usually down to about 30-degrees Fahrenheit, depending on the region and the amount of moisture in the air -- and pumps it into the home. When the temperature drops below freezing, there's not enough heat in the air to sufficiently heat the home with the pump alone, so the backup electric or gas furnace kicks in to provide warmth.